The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith: Letters from a citizen of the world to his friends in the East

Front Cover
A. and W. Galignani and Jules Didot, 1825
 

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Contents

The reception of the Chinese from a Lady of distinction
49
Against cruelty to animals A story from the Zendevest of Zoroaster
52
Of falsehood propagated by books seemingly sincere
56
Of the war now carried on between France and England with its frivolous motives
59
The story of the Chinese matron
63
The English method of treating women caught in adultery The Russian method
68
Some account of the republic of letters in England
72
The Chinese goes to see a play
76
The Chinese philosophers son made a slave in Persia
81
The English subscription in favour of the French prisoners commended
84
The venders of quack medicines and nostrums ridiculed
88
The natural rise and decline of kingdoms exemplified in the history of the kingdom of Lao
91
The character of the man in black with some instances of Lisanconsistent conduct
96
The history of the man in black
100
Some of the causes
107
The ladies advised to get husbands A story to this pur
113
A description of a club of authors III
114
XXXI The perfection of the Chinese in the art of gardening The description of a Chinese garden
121
Of the degeneracy of some of the English nobility A mushroomfeast among the Tartars
124
The manner of writing among the Chinese The eastern tales of magazines etc ridiculed
128
Of the present ridiculous passion of the nobility for paint ing
134
The philosophers son describes a lady his fellowcaptive
138
A continuance of his correspondence The beautiful cap tive consents to marry her lord
141
The correspondence still continued He begins to be dis
144
The Chinese philosopher praises the justice of a late sen
150
The history of China more replete with great actions than
165
A booksellers visit to the Chinese
204
The absurd taste for obscene and pert novels such as Tris
213
Letter Page LXI Proper lessons to a youth entering the world with fables suited to the occasion 246
214
An authentic history of Catherina Alexowna wife of Pe ter the Great 250
215
Some thoughts on the present situation of affairs in
225
The rise or the decline of literature not dependent on man but resulting from the vicissitudes of nature
256
The great exchange happiness for show Their folly in this respect of use to society
259
Life endeared by age
298
The description of a little great man
301
The necessity of amusing each other with new books in sisted upon
305
The preference of grace to beauty an allegory
309
The behaviour of a shopkeeper and his journeyman
313
The French ridiculed after their own manner
316
The preparations of both theatres for a winter campaign
319
The evil tendency of increasing penal laws or enforcing even those already in being with rigour
322
The ladies trains ridiculed
326
The sciences useful in a populous state prejudicial in a barbarous one
329
Some cautions on life taken from a modern philosopher of China
330
Anecdotes of several poets who lived and died in circum stances of wretchedness
338
The trifling squabbles of stageplayers ridiculed
342
The races of Newmarket ridiculed The description of a cartrace
347
The folly of the western parts of Europe in employing the Russians to fight their battles
350
The influence of climate and soil upon
366
The fondness of some to admire the writings of lords
373
A description of the courts of justice in Westminster
387
The Chinese philosopher begins to think of quitting Eng
403
The Chinese philosopher attempts to find out famous
423
On the different sects in England particularly Methodism
431
An election described
435
A literary contest of great importance in which both sides fight by epigram
438
Against the marriage act A fable
443
On the danger of having too high an opinion of human na ture
448
Whether love be a natural or fictitious passion
452
A city nightpiece
456
On the meanness of the Dutch at the court of Japan
459
On the distresses of the poor exemplified in the life of a private sentinel
462
On the absurdity of some late English titles
468
The irresolution of the English accounted for
471
The manner of travellers in their usual relations ridiculed
473
The conclusion
478

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Page 115 - That dimly show'd the state in which he lay ; The sanded floor, that grits beneath the tread ; The humid wall with paltry pictures spread...
Page 457 - ... and, with short-sighted presumption, promised themselves immortality! Posterity can hardly trace the situation of some; the sorrowful traveller wanders over the awful ruins of others ; and, as he beholds, he learns wisdom, and feels the transience of every sublunary possession.
Page 299 - ... of manhood ; the numberless calamities of decaying nature, and the consciousness of surviving every pleasure, would at once induce him, with his own hand, to terminate the scene of misery ; but happily the contempt of death forsakes him at a time when it could only be prejudicial, and life acquires an imaginary value in proportion as its real value is no more.
Page 467 - Though we had no arms, one Englishman is able to beat five French at any time; so we went down to the door where both the sentries were posted, and rushing upon them, seized their arms in a moment, and knocked them down. From thence nine of us ran together to the quay, and seizing the first boat we met, got out of the harbour and put to sea.
Page 299 - A mind long habituated to a certain set of objects, insensibly becomes fond of seeing them ; visits them from habit, and parts from them with reluctance...
Page 27 - Our greatest glory is, not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.
Page 102 - ... or a black coat when I generally dressed in brown, I thought was such a restraint upon my liberty, that I absolutely rejected the proposal. A priest in England is not the same mortified creature with a bonze in China : with us, not he that fasts best, but eats best, is...
Page 223 - By this time we were arrived as high as the stairs would permit us to ascend, till we came to what he was facetiously pleased to call the first floor down the chimney; and, knocking at the door, a voice from within demanded 'who's there?
Page 272 - Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego, All earth-born cares are wrong ; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 116 - William show'd his lamp-black face. The morn was cold ; he views with keen desire The rusty grate unconscious of a fire : With beer and milk arrears the frieze was scored, And five crack'd tea-cups dress'd the chimney board, A nightcap deck'd his brows instead of bay, A cap by night — a stocking all the day ! * A PROLOGUE, WRITTEN AND SPOKEN BY THE POET LABEBTD8, A ROMAN KNIGHT, WHOM CJESAS.

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