Cousin Harry, Volume 1; Volume 512

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Page 128 - Conscious beauty adorned with conscious virtue! What a spirit is there in those eyes ! What a bloom in that person ! How is the whole woman expressed in her appearance ! Her air has the beauty of motion, and her look the force of language.
Page 35 - When the flower is i' the bud and the leaf is on the tree, The larks shall sing me hame in my ain countree; Hame, hame, hame, O hame fain wad I be — O hame, hame, hame, to my ain countree ! The green leaf o' loyaltie's beginning for to fa', The Bonnie White Rose it is withering an...
Page 292 - ... taste is gratified by chronicles of sport, the lover of adventure will find a number of .perils and escapes to hang over, and the lover of a frank good-humoured way of speech will find the book a pleasant one in every page.
Page 44 - Not with eyeservice, as menpleasers; but as the servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart; With good will doing service, as to the Lord, and not to men...
Page 26 - O ! gladness comes to many, But sorrow comes to me, As I look o'er the wide ocean To my ain countree. O ! it's not my ain ruin That saddens aye my ee, But the love I left in Galloway, Wi...
Page 292 - It combines with lucidity and acuteness of judgment, freshness of fancy and elegance of sentiment. In its cheerful and instructive pages sound moral principles are forcibly inculcated, and everyday truths acquire an alrof novelty, and are rendered peculiarly attractive by being expressed In that epigrammatic language which so largely contributed to the popularity of the author's former work, entitled * Proverbial Philosophy.
Page 43 - There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at its flood, leads on to fortune...
Page 43 - Omitted, all the voyage of our life Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Page 78 - Mulcaster," said Blanche, rising with heightened colour, " I had better go now." " Why; will she eat you ?" " Oh no," laughing, " but—" " Will she come in here ? if so, I had better be off too.

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