Pleasures, Objects, and Advantages of Literature

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T. Bosworth, 1851 - 301 pages
 

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Page xii - Some bright idea of the master's mind, Where a new world leaps out at his command, And ready nature waits upon his hand : When the ripe colours soften and unite, And sweetly melt into just shade and light ; When mellowing years their full perfection give, And each bold figure just begins to live...
Page 137 - Tis known that Thou and I were one; I'll think it but a fond conceit— It cannot be, that Thou art gone! Thy vesper-bell hath not yet toll'd :— And thou wert aye a masker bold! What strange disguise hast now put on To make believe that thou art gone?
Page 31 - Warr'd on by cranes : though all the giant brood Of Phlegra with the heroic race were join'd That fought at Thebes and Ilium, on each side Mix'd with auxiliar gods ; and what resounds In fable or romance of Uther's...
Page 141 - Pelops' line, Or the tale of Troy divine, Or what (though rare) of later age Ennobled hath the buskined stage. But, O sad Virgin, that thy power Might raise Musaeus from his bower ; Or bid the soul of Orpheus sing Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what love did seek...
Page 153 - I took as much delight in reading as you do ; it would be the means of alleviating many tedious hours in my present retirement. But, to my misfortune, I derive no pleasure from such pursuits.
Page 132 - Eftsoones they heard a most melodious sound, Of all that mote delight a dainty ear, Such as at once might not on living ground, Save in this paradise, be heard elsewhere : Right hard it was for wight which did it hear To read what manner music that mote be; For all that pleasing is to living ear Was there consorted in one harmony; Birds, voices, instruments, winds, waters, all agree.
Page 230 - Paint me an angel, with wings and a trumpet, to trumpet my name over the world.
Page 104 - For gain, not glory, wing'd his roving flight, And grew immortal in his own despite.
Page 131 - And ever-drizling raine upon the loft, Mixt with a murmuring winde, much like the sowne Of swarming bees, did cast him in a swowne : No other noyse, nor peoples troublous cryes, As still are wont t' annoy the walled towne, Might there be heard: but carelesse Quiet lyes, Wrapt in eternall silence farre from enimyes.
Page xv - So that if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which as ships pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other?

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