The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it is with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms, Prognostics, and Several Cures of It. In Three Partitions; with Their Several Sections, Members, and Subsections, Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up

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Chatto and Windus, 1883 - 747 pages
 

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Page 494 - The young man, a philosopher, otherwise staid and discreet, able to moderate his passions, though not this of love, tarried with her awhile to his great content, and at last married her, to whose wedding, amongst other guests came Apollonius; who, by some probable conjectures, found her out to be a serpent, a lamia; and that all her furniture was, like Tantalus' gold, described by Homer, no substance but mere illusions.
Page 429 - The skill of the physician shall lift up his head : and in the sight of great men he shall be in admiration.
Page 3 - I have little, I want nothing : all my treasure is in Minerva's tower. Greater preferment as I could never get, so am I not in debt for it. I have a competency (laus Deo) from my noble and munificent patrons.
Page 3 - Today we hear of new lords and officers created, to-morrow of some great men deposed, and then again of fresh honours conferred ; one is let loose, another imprisoned ; one purchaseth, another breaketh; he thrives, his neighbour turns bankrupt; now plenty, then again dearth and famine; one runs, another rides, wrangles, laughs, weeps, &c.
Page 3 - I have no wife nor children, good or bad, to provide for ; a mere spectator of other men's fortunes and adventures, and how they act their parts, which methinks are diversely presented unto me, as from a common theatre or scene. I hear new news every day...
Page 161 - ... winding and unwinding themselves as so many clocks, and still pleasing their humours, until at last the SCENE...
Page 12 - I neglect phrases, and labour wholly to inform my reader's understanding, not to please his ear; 'tis not my study or intent to compose neatly, which an orator requires, but to express myself readily and plainly as it happens.
Page 106 - ... sum, intelligible even to the meanest capacity; and that is, Do not that to another, which thou wouldest not have done to thyself...
Page 346 - Wherefore I perceive that there is nothing better, than that a man should rejoice in his own works; for that is his portion: for who shall bring him to see what shall be after him?
Page 81 - And an heavy yoke is upon the sons of Adam, From the day that they go out of their mother's womb, Till the day that they return to the mother of all things.

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