The History of India from the Earliest Ages: The Vedic period and the Mahá Bhárata

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Contents

Súrya regarded as a divine spirit pervading all things
23
Grand monotheistic hymn translated by Professor Max Müller
29
Súdras
32
Duryodhanas surprise at the marvels at Indraprastha
33
CHAPTER I
42
Selfsacrifice of Mádrí on the funeral pile of her husband
45
Foundation of the great Raj of Bhárata by Raja Bharata
48
Importance of the question from the general tendency
49
Loyalty of Bhishma towards his two halfbrothers
55
418
66
Original idea of Satí amongst the Scythians
69
Krishnas visit to Duryodhana
74
2nd Education of the Kauravas and Pándavas by Drona
75
Distinction between the two classes of Brahmans viz 1
78
Galleries adorned with flags and garlands
85
PA422
86
Bhímas contemptuous language towards Karna
91
Review of the foregoing myth Its incredibility
95
Practical astronomy
100
Ancient wars to be found amongst the earliest traditions
105
Life of the Pándavas as mendicant Bráhmans in the city
110
Ancient and modern condition of the Bhíls
115
Raja Drupada sends his Purohita as Envoy to the Pandavas
124
Possibility of the legend originating from an independent source
134
Nature of the sacrifices
136
The modern Munnipurees a genuine relic of the Scythic Nágas
149
Relates the victories of Arjuna
153
Deep religious feeling in a hymn addressed to Varuna
158
Absence of allusions to animal sacrifice in the description
160
Probable character of the Rajas who were present at the Raja
163
Rajas of the Middle and South Countries
166
Contemporary splendour of the courts of the Rajas
169
History of British administration distinct from the history
175
CHAPTER VIII
187
Comprehensive character of the two poems
189
Advance of the Aryans into the Dekhan
191
Characteristics of the Bráhmans
193
Review of the foregoing narrative
198
The animals of the jungle implore Yudhishthira to leave
199
Jayadratha carries away Draupadí in his chariot by main force
200
Characteristics of the Kshatriyas
204
Draupadí enters the presence of the Rání
207
Youth and ignorance of Uttar
221
Questioned by his wives
222
Falls in love with Draupadí
227
City of Viráta identified with the site of the modern Dholka
233
Data by which the fact of an interpolation can be established
240
Reign of the blind Dhritarashtra
241
come to me last
245
3rd Embassy of Sanjaya to the Pándavas
252
3
254
Sends a Chieftain to inquire her name and lineage
257
Reverence paid to Krishna by the people of Hastinápur
262
The Pandavas receive the ambassador in Council
264
Mythical references to Krishna
271
Vyása appears and is received with great reverence
277
4th Rules agreed to on both sides for ameliorating the horrors
283
Brahmanical origin of the rules PAGE
284
Disappointment and wrath of the Asura
287
Mean character of the war Form in which the history of the war has been preserved
289
Born of a fishgirl named Matsya in Eastern Bengal
308
mans
318
5th Legend of the birth of Karna
324
Rejoicings of people
333
Krishna advises Bhíma to provoke Duryodhana to leave the PAGR
335
Garlands thrown from the verandahs
339
Krishna praised by a eulogist
389
Trick played by Krishna upon Bhíma
392
Perfumes distributed by beautiful girls
407
Introduction of Babhruváhana
418
Sensational descent into the city of Serpents
424
Jesting conversation between Bhíma and Krishna
426
The Buddhist procession
434
Grandeur of the picture of the resurrection of the dead who
442
Story of the three Rishis purely mythical
453
Personal character of Krishna
459
Wrath of Kali at finding that Nala was chosen
478
Main incidents of the story
480
Mirth of Indra
485
the name of Váhuka Meets his old charioteer Várshneya
491
Nala freed from Kali
497
cooked Damayantí sends her children to Nala
498
The second Swayamvara opposed to Brahmanical ideas
504
Kansa seizes the supposed daughter of Devaki who escapes
508
The Bráhmans a professional class officiating for both Aryans
509
The Raja promises that Sarmishthá shall be servant to Deva
515
Confusion in the application of the terms Devatás and Daityas
520
Vast influence exercised by the two poems upon the masses
522
Sports of the daughter of the Minister and daughter of
529
Exaggerations and embellishments to be treated with
535
Agreement impossible
536
Arrival of the son of the Bhíl Raja
537
Remonstrances of Drona
538
Exaggerated slaughter
539
Thirteenth day of the war and third of Dronas command 310
540
320
541
Pursuit of Jayadratha
542
387
543
421
544
Preserved alive by his nurse
545
Bhíma rends Vaka asunder
546
Inferiority of the speeches to those in Homer and Thucydides
547
119
548
CHAPTER XVII
549
Her curses and threats
550
Duryodhana jealous of the Rajasúya plots to dispossess
551
Historical form of the tradition
552
Resemblance to a tournament
553
First adventure of the horse
554
Draupadi orders his release
555
270
556
55
557
Contrast between the historical traditions of Krishna and
558
the cattle at Vrindavana
559
The Brahmanic age coeval with the composition of the
560
38
561
Palace of the Raja
562
Prominent part taken by the Scythic Nágas in the history
563
Extraordinary plot of the Kauravas to burn the Pándavas
564
154
565
VOL I
567
20
568
Escape of Damayanti
569
Beautiful wives of the Serpents
570
Pavilions for the suitors
571
Invasion of Susarman in the northern quarter
573
464
574
Morning of the gambling match
575
VOL I
579
CHAPTER III
124

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Page 154 - Bring no more vain oblations; incense is an abomination unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; it is iniquity, even the solemn meeting. Your new moons and your appointed feasts my soul hateth: they are a trouble unto me; I am weary to bear them.
Page 154 - To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto Me ? saith the LORD : I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts ; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he-goats.
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