The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, D.D. ...: With Notes, Historical and Critical, Volume 2

Front Cover
W. Durell, 1812
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 42 - But what success Vanessa met, Is to the world a secret yet. Whether the nymph, to please her swain, Talks in a high romantic strain; Or whether he at last descends To act with less seraphic ends; Or to compound the business, whether They temper love and books together; Must never to mankind be told, Nor shall the conscious Muse unfold.
Page 204 - That's very strange ; but, if you had not supped, I must have got something for you. Let me see, what should I have had ? A couple of lobsters ; ay, that would have done very well ; two shillings ; tarts, a shilling ; but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket I' ' No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Page 198 - I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to be the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.
Page 9 - A father, and the nymph his child. That innocent delight he took To see the virgin mind her book, Was but the master's secret joy In school to hear the finest boy.
Page 197 - He was perfectly astonished with the historical account I gave him of our affairs during the last century, protesting •' it was only a heap of conspiracies, rebellions, murders, massacres, revolutions, banishments, the very worst effects that avarice, faction, hypocrisy, perfidiousness, cruelty, rage, madness, hatred, envy, lust, malice, or ambition, could produce.
Page 64 - ... state, in order to put it out of the power of slander to be busy with her fame after death, she adjured him by their friendship to let her have the satisfaction of dying at least, though she had not lived, his acknowledged wife.
Page 251 - Of Swift's general habits of thinking, if his letters can be supposed to afford any evidence, he was not a man to be either loved or envied. He seems to have wasted life in discontent, by the rage of neglected pride, and the languishment of unsatisfied desire.
Page 226 - Ericks, who derive their lineage from Erick the Forester, a great commander, who raised an army to oppose the invasion of William the Conqueror...
Page 29 - Oh ! that you may have but so much regard for me left that this complaint may touch your soul with pity. I say as little as ever I can ; did you but know what I thought, I am sure it would move you to forgive me ; and believe I cannot help telling you. this and live.
Page 204 - Ay, any one that did not know so well as I do might believe you. But since you are come, I must get some supper for you, I suppose.

Bibliographic information