Speeches and Forensic Arguments, Volume 2

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Tappan, Whittemore, and Mason, 1848
 

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Page 166 - Canada acceding to this Confederation, and joining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union: but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine states.
Page 180 - THAT A NATIONAL GOVERNMENT OUGHT TO BE ESTABLISHED, CONSISTING OF A SUPREME LEGISLATURE, JUDICIARY, AND EXECUTIVE.
Page 184 - The fabric of American Empire ought to rest on the solid basis of THE CONSENT OF THE PEOPLE. The streams of National power ought to flow immediately from that pure original fountain of all legitimate authority.
Page 205 - It has a preamble, and that preamble expressly recites, that the duties which it imposes are laid " for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures.
Page 433 - November, 1788, nor upon the indemnities mutually due or claimed, the parties will negotiate further on these subjects at a convenient time, and until they may have agreed upon these points the said treaties and convention shall have no operation, and the relations of the two countries shall be regulated as follows :* Art.
Page 131 - In this conclusion, I am confirmed as well by the opinions of Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, who have each repeatedly recommended the exercise of this right under the Constitution, as by the uniform practice of Congress, the continued acquiescence of the States, and the general understanding of the people.
Page 174 - ... 3. That there is a supreme law consisting of the Constitution of the United States, and acts of Congress passed in pursuance of it, and treaties ; and that, in cases not capable of assuming the character of a suit in law or equity, Congress must judge of, and finally interpret, this supreme law so often as it has occasion to pass acts of legislation ; and in cases capable of assuming, and actually assuming, the character of a suit, the Supreme Court of the United States is. the final interpreter.
Page 74 - The Constitution has prescribed that Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers: and there is no one proportion or divisor, which, applied to the respective numbers of the States, will yield the number and allotment of Representatives proposed by the bill.
Page 249 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Page 276 - all ' officers of the United States whose appointments are not in the Constitution otherwise provided for...

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