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KLOPSTOCK.

His Life and Works, "THE MESSIAH,' ODES.—General Criti-

cisms on his Works

LESSING.

His Life and Works, "GROUP OF LAOKOON,' 'NATHAN

DER WEISE,' FABLES, EPIGRAMS.—General Criti-

cisms

WIELAND.

His Life and Works, ‘OBERON.' Criticisms

HERDER.

His Life and Works, “IDEEN ZUR PAILOSOPHIE DER

GESCHICHTE DER MENSCHHEIT,' CID,' LYRICS.-

Criticisms

JEAN PAUL FRIEDERICH RICHTER.
His Life and Works, ‘TITAN,' 'MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS,'

• VORSCHULE DER ÆSTHETIK.'-Criticisms
GÖTHE.
His Life and Works, "GÖTZ VON BERLICHINGEN, WER-

THER'S LEIDEN,' 'IPHIGENIA AUF TAURIS, EGMONT,'
· TORQUATO Tasso,' "WAHRHEIT UND DICHTUNG,'
• WILHELM MEISTER, HERMANN AND DOROTHEA,'

WAHLVERWANDSCHAFTEN,' 'GöTHE'S LYRICS'
FAUST.-FIRST PART (An Essay)

SECOND PART (An Essay), Criticisms .

SCHILLER.

THE LATE PRINCE CONSORT'S LINES

SCHILLER'S Life and Works. DIE RAEUBER, "VER-

SCHWÖRUNG DES FIESCO, CABALE UND LIEBE,'

· DUN KARLOS.' Extracts from Schiller's Historical

Works, ' WALLENSTEIN,” “Maria STUART,” 'JUNGFRAU

VON ORLEANS,' 'BRAUT VON MESSINA,' WILHELM

TELL .

SCHILLER'S LYRICS.

Introductory Remarks, 'IDEALE,

'IDEALE,' 'IDEAL

LEBEN, AN DIE FREUDE,' 'DIE KÜNSTLER.'-
Ballads, ‘RITTER TOGGENBURG,' 'DIE BÜRGSCHAFT,'

‘DER TAUCHER,' 'Das LIED VON DER GLOCKE'
SCHILLER's own Criticisms on his Works, contained in a

number of Letters to his Literary Friends

CONCLUDING REMARKS, introductory to the Writers of the

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Romantic School

359_365

366, 367

TO THE READER.

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THIS work, the result of long and conscientious labour, owes,

, in a great measure, its origin to the encouragement given to me, by the critical Periodicals of this country, when some years ago I published my first Essay on the subject.

Of the many difficulties I had to contend with, one of the greatest-the materials once collected-has been to give to every group its symmetrical proportions, to assign to the prominent figures their proper places, so as to enable the Reader to survey with ease the whole literary landscape like a vast panorama.

Hence the necessity for introducing order and simplicity into the arrangement; my object being not so much to write a learned work (of which there exist already many), as to produce one that should be intelligible, because concise; and thus prove practically useful to the Reader. To attain this desideratum, I have treated the subject chronologically in the various Introductory Essays, and alphabetically, as regards the Writers and their Works, in the Lists accompanying each period.

The Translations, either prepared by myself, or selected from British authors of acknowledged literary standing, will, I trust, be acceptable to the Reader.

I am anxious to express here, how deeply indebted I feel to the many gifted British interpreters of the literature of my native country, among whom the gentle sex are so conspicuously and worthily represented. The Reader will, I am sure, know how to appreciate those beautiful hymns, so well translated by Miss WÉNKWORTH, Miss SWANWICK's stirringly graphic and truthful version of the passages taken from Faust, and ETA Mawr's exquisite Poem, 'Devotion.' He will, no doubt, in reading Sir EDWARD BULWER Lytton's translations from SchilLER, the many citations from the celebrated author of Göthe's life, Mr. LEWES, Mr. Edgar Taylor's beautiful Minstrel Songs, the successful versions of German Poems given by Messrs. BOWRING, MERIVALE, KNOX, MARTIN, AYTOUN, ANSTER, HAY

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WARD, COLERIDGE, IRVINE, CARLYLE, and others, endorse the generally expressed opinion as regards the intrinsic merit belonging to their translations.

Conscious of my obligations towards them all, and other British writers who so worthily keep up, in the critical Periodicals, the literary fame of a country which produced a Shakespeare, I must here express my unfeigned regret, that the limits assigned to this portion of my work, precluded the possibility of availing myself still more extensively of so many other valuable specimens of their genius, an omission unavoidable; but which I hope to make good, if spared, in the Second Volume of my Review.

I have derived also, and I acknowledge it gratefully, the utmost advantage from the excellent, deservedly appreciated, works on German Literature, of VILMAR, JULIAN SCHMIDT, MENZEL, GERVINUS, KOBERSTEIN, FINDEL, BERNAYS, Professor Max MÜLLER, Kurz, and Pölitz, of DÜNTZER's and DEYCK's erudite commentaries on • Faust,' but especially from the first and last mentioned writers. As a foreigner, and purposely unaided in the compiling, writing, and correcting of this work, I appeal to the indulgence of the British Reader.

We live in times when the study of Foreign Literature, has, owing to the increased intercourse between nations, become both a necessity and a duty. Nothing tends more to the spread of civilisation thau reciprocal mental intercourse; for nations, who all have their merits and demerits, will, by studying one another, soon learn how to appreciate and respect each other. Gradations and varieties exist in the physical and intellectual world, -Providence willed it thus; but, in the aggregate, they form a beautifully harmonious unit. This harmony in the universe, so often ignored by man, is the Eternal Standard on which are emblazoned indelibly the wordsOrder, Peace, Love.' Let us, in following it, remember Schiller's words, so full of import-Seid umschlungen Millionen.'

THE AUTHOR.

6

6

6

ROYAL MILITARY ACADEMY,

WOOLWICH.

December, 1862.

ARMINIU S.

AN INTRODUCTORY POEM,

WRITTEN BY THE AUTHOR.

ANN Berge und Thäler glühen,

Im ros'gen Dämmerschein :
Arminius steigt hernieder,

Und schwebet über'm Rhein.

Es leuchtet sein Auge so düster,

Er seufzet tief und schwer;
Sein Antlitz, voll innerem Leiden,

Ist göttergleich und hehr.

Stumm blicket umher der Cherusker,

Ruft dann mit bitter'm Hohn:
“Sind das die Germanen, vor denen

Die Römer einst gefloh’n ?

“ Einst fochten die alten Teutonen,

Mit Kolbe, Streitaxt, Schwert
Beim ew'gen Wodan, die waren

Des deutschen Namens werth!

“ Sie

sangen, dass mächtig erdröhnten Wald, Hain und Felsenkluft; Das schreckte die wilden Geier

Im Horst und in der Luft.

“ Noch jetzt zu den seligen Höhen,

Steigt Sang und Rauch empor; Doch zieh'n wir der ewigen Leier

Die Schwerterklänge vor."

Die Stimme des greisen Cheruskers

Durch Deutschlands Gauen hallt, Sie wecket die alten Kämpen

Im Teutoburger Wald.

Die steigen empor aus den Grüften,

Drauf singen sie im Chor;
O drängen die Worte mahnend

In jedes deutsche Ohr!

Sie singen mit donnernder Stimme,

(Es horcht die Loreley), Vom Volke einst gross und mächtig,

Den Barden stark und frei!

Von Varus und seinen Legionen,

Der blut’gen Römerschlacht, Von längst verklungenen Sagen

Des alten Reiches Pracht!

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