The history of England, Volume 3

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Page 539 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 47 - ... provided this liberty be not extended to Popery or Prelacy, nor to such as, under the profession of Christ, hold forth and practise licentiousness.
Page 38 - that have forced me to do this. I have sought the Lord both day and night, that he would rather slay me, than put me on the doing of this work.
Page 212 - shall find that I am possessed of that prerogative which, in the case of Lord Stafford, he thought proper to deny me.
Page 380 - I recommended my soul to God, and my cause to my country.
Page 377 - Robert had heard them all he assured them that he was conscious of having meant well ; that in the present inflamed temper of the people the act could not be carried into execution without an armed force...
Page 308 - Papist at the age of eighteen is to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, and subscribe the declaration against transubstantiation...
Page 262 - That king James II. having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and having, by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, violated the fundamental laws, and withdrawn himself out of the kingdom ; has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 134 - And be it farther enacted, that all clauses in this act shall be construed most largely and beneficially for the suppressing conventicles, and for the justification and encouragement of all persons to be employed in the execution thereof.
Page 539 - ... anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves; they did eat the dead carrions, happy where they could find them; yea, and one another soon after, insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves ; and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast...

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