The History of England, from the Accession of George III, 1760, to the Accession of Queen Victoria, 1837, Volume 7

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Page 10 - ... it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage — how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder. Such as is one of these magnificent machines when springing from inaction into a display of its might — such is England herself, while apparently passive and motionless she silently concentrates the power to...
Page 150 - That is not the case now. Let the soldier be abroad ; in the present age he can do nothing. There is another person abroad — a less important person in the eyes of some ; an insignificant person, whose labours have tended to produce this state of things.
Page 395 - Russell moved for a Committee of the whole House to take into consideration the state of Ireland.
Page 409 - But if the spirit of the Reform Bill implies merely a careful review of institutions, civil and ecclesiastical, undertaken in a friendly temper, combining, with the firm maintenance of established rights, the correction of proved abuses and the redress of real grievances, -in that case, I can for myself and colleagues undertake to act in such a spirit and with such intentions.
Page 10 - You well know, Gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness, how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage — how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Page 10 - Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than the state of inertness and inactivity in which I have seen those mighty masses that float in the waters above your town, is a proof they are devoid of strength, and incapable of being fitted out for action. You well know...
Page 410 - ... to consider also the state of the several cathedral and collegiate churches in England and Wales, with a view to the suggestion of such measures as may render them conducive to the efficiency of the established church, and to devise the best mode of providing for the cure of souls, with special reference to the residence of the clergy on their respective benefices...
Page 11 - ... times against her or at her side, England needs a period of tranquillity, and may enjoy it without fear of misconstruction. Long may we be enabled, gentlemen, to improve the blessings of our present situation, to cultivate the arts of peace, to give to commerce, now reviving, greater extension and new spheres of employment, and to confirm the prosperity now generally diffused throughout this island.
Page 165 - Does not a tremendous organization extend over the whole island ? Have not all the natural bonds by which men are tied together been broken and burst asunder ? Are not all the relations of society, which exist elsewhere, gone ? Has not property lost its influence? has not rank been stripped of the respect which should belong to it ? and has not an internal government grown up, which, gradually superseding the legitimate authorities, has armed itself with a complete domination ? Is it nothing that...
Page 290 - And whilst I am stating the obligation imposed by the law on every subject of the realm, I wish to observe, that the law acknowledges no distinction in this respect between the soldier and the private individual. The soldier is still a citizen, lying under the same obligation and invested with the same authority to preserve the peace of the King as any other subject.

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