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they differ from them. Such wri. contend against us, lest haply they ters, we are convinced, are the very be found to fight against God." men who multiply the sects they Old times will rewrn. The multidetest. Let other writers arise, with tude called upon by this author to the same cavdour as the author be read the histories of the Fathers of fore us, and a more intimate ac- the English Church will no longer quaintance with the subject; let the say “these were the fathers, but ministers of the Establishment cling where are the children?”—they will to those fundamental doctrines of discern their glorious features stampScripture more than ouce adverted ed upon our countenance; they will to in this striking review; let them discover in our hands “keys” which give the same momentum to the will at least open the hearts of their grand national machine which car- countrymen; the most unequivoyies on the little go-cart of the Me, cal “right of succession” in the inthodists; let each man consider bis heritance of our ancestors' virtues; own neighbourhood as a little level and the best “ patrimony” wbịch to be recovered from the encroach- St. Peter and the whole college of 'ments of vice by embankments Apostles had to bequeath-those raised by his own hands; and, under doctrines and practices which they tbe Divine blessing,ibe face of things lived and died to establish and disa will change. Honest men will not seminate,

LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL INTELLIGENCE,

** For the Literary and Philosophical Intelligence (including an account of the Finance

of Great Britain, Intelligence from Daford and Cambridge, Hertford College Esoramalim, List of Books, $c.) see the Appendir for 1810. We shall insert in this number only the Cambridge University Honours. They are as follows---vis.

WRANGLERS: 1. Dicey, Trin. ; 2. Caius; 10. Rogers, Sydney; 11. Com French, Caius: 3. Hustler, 4. Ally, Jesus; mcline, Joho's; 12. Bickerstatt, Trin., 13. 3. Chainbers, 6. Brass, 7. Evans, 8. Poulter, Wallis, Magd.; 14. Dury, Pemb.; 16. 9. Prowde, Trin.; 10. Johuson, Jobu's; 11. Buck, Caius; 16. Field, Jobn's; 17, Wilkin Vioruimer, Queen's; 12. Allix, John's; 13.

son, Trin. Bloomfield, Caius ; 14. Adeune, Trin.; 15. JUNIOR OPTIMES. — 1. Baker, John's Lambe, Bene't.

2. Barlow, Trin.; 3. Storry, Queen's ; Senior OrTimes. — 1. Grace, Pemb.; Maynard, Trin. ; 5. Bligh, Joho's ; 6. Carry 3. Haggit, Christ's ; 3. Frazer, 4. Lloyd, Trin.; 7. Kitebingman, 8. Hales, Clare; 9 Prin.; 5. Abdy, Jesus; 6. Wilson, Pemb.; Backhouse, Pembı; 10. Willatts, 11. Way 7. Edwards, 8. Campbell, John's; 9. Smyth, Trin,

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE,

TOE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CIRISTIAN Rev. Charles Daubeny, Dean of Sarum, XNOWLEDGE.

which we had occasion to comment, att Tue Report of the Society for promoting cose of our yolume for 1809, (p. 810 Christian Knowledge for the year 1809, has The Bishop of Norwich is so far from reite, recently been published. It is preceded by ating his predecessor's attack on the schon a Sermon, preached in St. Paul's Cathedral, which liavo been erected on the Lancastria by Dr. Bathurst, the present Bishop of Nor- plan, that he seenis plainly to point to them wich. This sermon seems to have been in- in common with other similar institution tended by his lordship as an antidote to that when, after shewing the advantages while preached last year in the same place by the would flow “ from a general, well-regulate

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patuitous education of the poor," he adds, Welsh Scriptures, with the Common Prayer that the benevolent exertions of many ex- and Singing Psalms, amounting to 20,000 eellat persons anuong us, (especially for copies, which the society resolved in Marcli, site years past) to meliorate the condition 1805, to print for circulation in Wales, is of the poor, and to promote the education of now in a course of distribution. The whole their children, exceed every thing of which charge of this edition, with the binding in we have an aceout in any other nation, or calf, is defrayed by the Society, and copies in any other period in the history of our ownl." are furnished to any of the inhabitants of With a liberality which is highly creditable Wales, through the medium of the Bishops, obim, his lordship thrus endeavours to mode or any other members of the Soviety, at six fate these feelings of jealousy, respecting the shillings each, which is considerably less than British and Foreign Bible Societies, which half the prime cost. This intelligence was comhave been unhappily entertained by some municated to the principality in a circular letBrubers of the establishment.

ter addressed by Dr. Gaskin to the members * Let then Christians, of every denoni- of the Society residing within it. “The comnatico, who have at heart the true interest munication, it is added, " has been received s domestic, or of social life ; let every friend with great satisfaction, and numerous apto the welfare of his country ; let every lover plications are made and continue to be of mankind, contribute a portion of his titne made for copies *.” “ The society cannot but and money to this great work and labour of feel grateful to Almighty God, that they are bone;' (the work of edacating the poor). Let thus enabled to dispense the sacred records the members of the Church of England more of His holy word, and the pure apostolicalparticularly endeavour, in the first place, to Liturgy of the Church of England, amongst a had the highly useful exertions of the people so anxious to receive them; and they Society for promoting Christian Knowledge; continue fervently to supplicate the great Head best let them not stop here, and imagine that of the church, that these their efforts may be they have done enough; let them enlarge productive of lasting good, to the glory of his fieis viens, and, by a comprehensive and name, the enlargement of his fold, and the wed-placed liberality, enconrage and support eternal salvation of souls.” To this pious other ausiliary sucieties, the generous aim of prayer we add our cordial amen! which is to communicate to those who sit in Fire thousand copies of the Common darkness, and in the shadow of death, the Prayer in the Mank's language have also gorizes light of revelation, by circulating been recently printed, and distributed in the trang them the knowledge of the Bible. Isle of Man, at a litile more than one third Os the circumstances which arise in framing of the prime cost. nch designs, it is possible that men's minds The number of subscribing members to

bay sand divided for a season; upon such this institution is now 3,560, of whom about 1;1 points, therefore, I assugie no privilege, trom 475 have been added since the beginning of

this occasion, to speak for others. If the 1809. The number of schools under their
uain end to be pursued, the dissemination direction is 116, containing about 5,000 scho-
of Christian knowlege, were attended to, in lars. The number of Bibles sent to the mem-
every town and village of the united king. bers during the preceding year is 8,760;
tam, as it well deserves to be, with earnest- of New Testaments and Psalters, 12,540 ;
these and assiduity, there is nothing which of Common Prayers, 19,060; of other
might not be hoped for. The moral world bound books, 19,440; of Tracts, 120,236.
muld soon assume a new face; and it is Besides which, 773 Bibles, 2,629 New
hardly too much to say, that this happy and Testaments and Psalters, 76 Cominou
Highly-tarvured island would, in a few years, Prayers, 424 other bound books, and
baas same faint resemblance (allowing for 6,114 tracts, have been sent gratuitously to
barua imperfections) to that heavenly city. the East Indies, to the Royal Navy, and in
which the beloved disciple of our Lord con- various other channels. We observe a very
lempleted in a vision. 'A city which had proper note at the end of the Society's list of
na ned of the sun, neither of the moun, to buoks. It apprises members that the pack-
dóne in it; for the glory of God did lighten ets of books which they receive on the termis
, and ibe Lamb is the light thereof; and of the Society ought to be paid for within
liete shall in no wise enter into it any thing three months after they have been received;
la defleth, neither whatsoever worketh and that no books on the Society's terms
mawasimation, or maketli a lie."

We now come to the Report itself. From * How strong a proof that Wales is not
to it appears tiat the new edition of the saturated with the Scriptures!

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will in future be granted to any member nation of the pure, unadulterated Gospe who is in arrear for two years' subscription, Jesus Christ, and lim crucified. or the amount of five pounds for books. We now coine to the account of the

In this Report are inserted the resolutions ciety's Protestant Mission in the East Ind on the subject of auxiliary societies, to buy for the year 1809. formed in the different dioceses throughout The Rev. Mr. Pæzold having written t the kingdom, to which we gave currency in the spirit of refractoriness and disorder wl our number for May 1810 (p. 393). We hope had appeared in the Malabar congregati the plan may have been found successful. at Vepery had been in part subdued The expenditure of the Society, from the me

means of the Secretary's letter in the na 13th April 1809, to March 29, 1810, of the Society, but that a few still continu amounts to about 16,000l. Of this sum, refractory; the Society intimated to about 12,4001. have been paid for books, &c. Pæzold, in reply, that the ancient rules of t including the Welsh Scriptures, the Manks mission ought to be observed as strictly Common Prayer, and some prayer books possible, and that the government of t for the Danish prisoners in Great Britain. The country, they trusted, would protect their mi expense of the East India mission is 1,2081. sionaries from disturbance. This the gover and of the Scilly Inission, 3871. Upwards of ment had shewn itself willing to do. Fro 700l. more are expended in different chari- a subsequent account it appears that thing table purposes ; and the remainder in sa

were more quiet. laries to officers, and various contingent ex- Mr. Pæzold, in January 1809, visited the penses. The receipts are

to a similar Christians at Pullicat, to whom he preache amount, and consist of, benefactions and le- several times. He administered the Lord gacies, 1,1771.- subscriptions from members Supper tothirty-nine Portuguese and twenty3,033-receipts for books, &c. 6,2301. (be- three Malabar Christians, and baptizesides 5,000l. of arrears still due)-dividends twenty-three children. He also visited an of various funds, of wbich 646l. are specie consoled the aged and infirm. In Februar fically for the East India missions, about he went to St. Thomas's Mount, and on bi 5,1001. The remainder consists of a re- arrival found all the good people assemble mission of the Income tax, 308l. and the pro- to hear the Gospel preached to them in their duce of an estate, 168l. The account of the own language. Two Roman Catholics were society's funds is followed by a statement, received into the congregation, and sever. which has also been separately circulated, heathens were publicly examined and bapwith a view to repel a prevalent opinion tized, who had been under instruction the that the income of the Society exceeds its some tinue. Before he departed, the people annual expenditure, and is in an accumulating gave him the contents of their alms-bos, state, and to prevent the donations which about nine pagodas, for their poor fellow would otherwise be made to them from being Christians at Pullicat; and though poot diverted into other channels. So far is this themselves, they promised, should God bless opinion from being correct, that in the year their undertakings, tu continue their weekly ending April 1809, it was necessary to sell collections for the same purpose.

Mr. 1,765l. three per cent, stock to meet the ex- Pæzold has sent extracts from his diary, froma cess of their expenditure over their income; which it appears, that the religious duties of and at the last audit a sum of 3,0201. re- the mission had been regularly performed by mained due to the bookseller and printer, himself, in conjunction with the catechists which was orer and above the amount of their and schoolmasters. The number of comreceipts for the year. The Board, however, municants in the native congregations on trust, that that gracious Providence, which Easter day, was nearly 200, who were all for more than a century past has enabled quiet and peaceable Christians. them to carry on their designs for promoting The Rev. Mr. Holzberg writes from Cad. Christian knowledge, and editying the body dalore, that his labours in the mission bave of Christ, will still furnish the means by been uninterrupted. In both the English - which these objects may be pursued with in- and Malabar congregations wany have beard creased activity and vigour." We very sin. the word profitably. His school, consisting cerely hope that this may be the case, and of twenty children, was under the care of that the Society for promoting Christian

a very able and worthy schoolinaster, called Knowledge, laying aside all prejudice and Pitshey-Matton, who had been recommended partial affection, will devote itself with by Mr. Kolhoff, of Tanjore. In 1806, he had energy and simplicity to the one great object baptized nineteen children and six adults: af its institution, the universal dissemi- the communicants were eighty-two.

17 be bad baptized four children, and A strict order had been given, by a late exthree adalts: the communicants were ninety- cellent collector, that no Christian should be eight. In 1808 be had baptized fourteen obliged to work on Sundays; but this order, children and fine converts: the communi- it seerns, is not enforced. cants were 102. He had dispersed books' Buddaloor was the very place where the and tracts in great numbers.

late Mr. Swartz was robbed of his gold stockThe Rer. Mr. Puhle writes from Trichina- buckle. At that time there was not a single pely, expressing his great satisfaction in Christian there, but now there is a great the appointment of Mr. Horst one of the number, as may be seen by the account of Seciay's missionaries. He observes, that in this mission for 1794. consequence of the age and infirmities of the The increase of the Tanjore congregation country priest, Sattianaden, and of the state is stated to be 35, viz. 2 Hindroos of high cast, of the southern congregation, ideas were en- 4 persons of the Kalla cast, 5 of the Palla tertained of ordaming, according to the rites cast, 15 Pariars, and 9 Papists. The comof the Latheran church, two or three of the municants wete 253. ftest catechists, that they may administer to The Danish Missionaries at Tranquebat the Taajore and southern congregations. had been put to great inconvenience by the

The Rev. Messrs. Kolhoff and Horst, the interraption of their usual supplies from masiosaries at Tanjore, speak of a Brahmin Copenhagen, and had applied to the goof abuse conversion to Christianity they had vernment of Madras for protection and good hopes. This Brahmin was willing to support, their pecuniary difficulties baving be employed in any situation in the mission, obliged them to lessen the number of their beat the income of the Tanjore mission being children and to postpone many urgent ore already inadequate to their most necessary jects. Their congregation, however, in the disbursements, the missionaries were under midst of these disadvantages, bad enjoyed the painful necessity of directing him to the means of grace, and had had an increase kokeat for assistance from the missions on of sixty-four children, born of Christian pathe coas. A great part of the revenues of rents, and fourteen adults, who had quitted the country were formerly allotted, by the heathenism, and accepted the saving Gospel Hiadoa kings, to the support of heathen of Christ; among these was a Mahrattian tuples and Brahmins; and this appropria- Brahmin, who spoke the Telinga language, tion is continued by the British government, and who had become, not only a theoretical, Whea a Brahmin, therefore, resolves to em but a real and practical Christian, in which brace Christianity, he not only draws on character he continued to persevere. Their himself the indignation of lús order, and of conmunicants were 1048. Mr. John, the all other Hindoos, but furfeits all the privi- missionary, bad lost his sight so as to be leges and emoluments he formerly enjoyed. unable to read and write ; as had the assisOf course he has none to look up io, for assis. tant, Mr Schreyfoget. In this state of afflictante in obtaining a livelihood, but to Chris- tion, the faithfal senior catechist Saroiragen,

and the other catechists in the Tranquebar The native fellow-labourers had continued district, had afforded them much comfort to assist Messrs. Kolhoff and Horst in preach. and assistance. The government of Madras ing the word of God to Christians and hea- had advanced, for the use of the mission, 200 thens, and had visited the country congrega- pagodas a month, which was, however, much ticas in a variety of places, exhurting them less than its necessities required. 10 live as became Christians. Sattiana- From the letters of Messrs. Kolhoff and den had been eroployed in dispensing the Horst is given a long extract, in which these Sacraments in various places. They com- gentlemen courment with muels feeling on plain much of the want of more Malabar Bi- certain passages in the fiticenth number of bles and Testaments in all the congregations; the transactions of the London Missionary and they state that great pains had been Society, which they understand to reflect on taken to inure the children under their care their conduct and that of their predecessors te habits of profitable industry. They men

in the mission, more particularly as having tips the real shewn by several members of made an unwarrantable compromise of printhe ssngregation at Buddaloor to act accord ciple, in the judulgence shewn to their cone ing to their Christian engagements. The

veris on the subject of Cast. Messrs. Craio Christinas

, it appears, have been often pre and Desgranges, in their Journal of the 5th Feated, by the heathen civil servants of the of March 1805, soon after they had arrived Censpany

, froin attending public worship on in India, observe, “ Our two lads” (CbrisSundays

, being called to work on that day. tian lads, we presume) are sick, but they

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will in future be granted to any member nation of the pure, unadulterated Gospel who is in arrear for two years' subscription, Jesus Christ, and lim crucified. or the amount of five pounds for books. We now come to the account of thies

In this Report are inserted the resolutions ciety's Protestant Mission in the East Indi on the subject of auxiliary societies, to buy for the year 1809. formed in the different dioceses throughout The Rev. Mr. Pæzold baving written th the kingdom, to which we gave currency in the spirit of refractoriness and disorder wbi our number for May 1810 (p. 393). We hope had appeared in the Malabar congregati the plan may have been found successful. at Vepery had been in part subdued

The expenditure of the Society, from the means of the Secretary's letter in the nar 13th April 1809, to March 29, 1810, of the Society, but that a few still continue amounts to about 16,000). Of this sum, refractory; the Society intimated to X about 12,4001. have been paid for books, &c. Pæzold, in reply, that the ancient rules of ti including the Welsh Scriptures, the Manks mission ought to be observed as strictly Common Prayer, and some prayer books possible, and that the government of t for the Danish prisoners iu Great Britain. The country, they trusted, would protect their mi expense of the East India mission is 1,208l. sionaries from disturbance. This the gover: and of the Scilly mission, 3871. Upwards of ment had shewn itself willing to do. Fro 700l. nuore are expended in different chari

a subsequent account it appears that thing table purposes; and the remainder in sa- were more quiet. laries to officers, and various contingent ex- Mr. Pæzold, in January 1809, visited th penses. The receipts are to a similar Christians at Pullicat, to whoin he preache amount, and consist of, benefactions and le- several times. He administered the Lord gacies, 1,1771.-subscriptions from members Supper tothirty-nine Portuguese and twenty3,0331.-receipts for books, &c. 6,2301. (be- three Malabar Christians, and baptizes sides 5,000l. of arrears still due)-dividends twenty-three children. He also visited an of various funds, of which 646l. are specie consoled the aged and infirm. In February fically for the East India missions, about be went to St. Thomas's Mount, and on his 5,1001. The remainder consists of a re- arrival found all the good people assemblet mission of the Income tax, 308l. and the pro- to hear the Gospel preached to them in their duce of an eslate, 168l. The account of the own language. Two Roman Catholics were society's funds is followed by a statement, received into the congregation, and severa which has also been separately circulated, heathens were publicly examined and bapwith a view to repel a prevalent opinion tized, who had been under instruction for that the income of the Society exceeds its some time. Before he departed, the people annual expenditure, and is in an accumulating gave him the contents of their alms-bos, state, and to prevent the donations which about nine pagodas, for their poor fellow would otherwise be made to them from being Christians at Pullicat; and though poor diverted into other channels. So far is this themselves, they promised, should God bless opinion from being correct, that in the year their undertakings, tu continue their weekly ending April 1809, it was necessary to sell collections for the same purpose.

Mr. 1,765), three per cent. stock to meet the ex- Pæzold has sent extracts from his diary, from cess of their expenditure over their income; which it appears, that the religious doties of and at the last audit a sum of 3,0201. re- the mission had been regularly performed by mained due to the bookseller and printer, bimself, in conjunction with the catechists which was over and above the amount of their and schoolmasters. The number of comreceipts for the year. The Board, however, municants in the native congregations on trust,“ that that gracious Providence, which Easter das, was nearly 200, who were all for more than a century past has enabled quiet and peaceable Christians. them to carry on their designs for promoting The Rev. Mr. Holzberg writes from CadChristian knowledge, and editying the body dalore, that his labours in the mission have of Christ, will still furnish the means by been uninterrupted. In botlı othe English which these objects may be pursued with in- and Malabar congregations may have heard creased activity and vigour." We very sin- the word profitably. His school

, consisting cerely hope that this may be the case, and of twenty children, was under the care of that the Society for promoting Christian

a very able and worthy schoolmaster, called Knowledge, laying aside all prejudice and Pitshey-Matton, who had been recommended partial affection, will devote itself with by Mr. Kolhoff, of Tanjore. In 1806, he had energy and simplicity to the one great object baptized nineteen children and six adults : of its institution, the universal dissemi- the communicants were eighty-two.

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