An Elementary Treatise on Natural Philosophy, Volume 1

Front Cover
George Kearsley, 1807
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

It is lovely to have this work available. Unfortunately, the plates at the end (pretty important) are not unfolded and scanned properly, so the images are all cut off.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 28 - ... that the volume of the mixture is less than the sum of the volumes of its compounds, and that the temperature of the mixture is higher than the common temperature of the liquids mixed.
Page 194 - This is erroneously accounted for by supposing that the water freezes far below the surface of the earth. But this is a great mistake; the most intense frost of a Siberian winter would not freeze the ground two feet deep, but a very moderate frost will consolidate the whole surface of a country, and make it impervious to the air, especially if the frost have been preceded by rain, which has soaked the surface. When this happens, the water which was filtering through the ground is...
Page 308 - In this gentleman's apparatus the string hangs vertically, its tension being regulated by a weight suspended at its lower extremity, a little below the place where the string comes into contact with a fixed pulley ; the length of the string is terminated at top by a horizontal edge ; the other point of termination, which in the common monochords, as well as in many musical instruments, and in the Stanhope monochord, is a bridge over which the string is stretched, is in this construction effected...
Page 287 - ... which being once filled, all the overplus of water that comes thither runs over by the lowest place, and breaking out by the sides of the hills forms single springs...
Page 38 - This property depends on the force of cohesion, or on that which chemists call affinity, joined to the arrangement of the particles, to their figure, and other circumstances. A body, says M. Hauy, is considered more hard in proportion as it presents greater resistance to the friction of another hard body, such as a steel file ; or as it is more capable of wearing or working into such other body, to which it may be applied by friction. Lapidaries judge of the hardness of fine stones...
Page 153 - ... those which are the cleanest, softest, most brilliant, and . most transparent. It is known that humidity lengthens the hair, and that the process of drying shortens it. To render both these effects more perceptible, Saussure attached one of the two ends of the hair to a fixed point, and the other . to the circumference of a moveable cylinder, that carries , at one of its extremities a light index or hand.
Page 72 - ... the distance from the point of suspension to the centre of oscillation must remain the same.
Page 151 - For example, water by introducing itself within cords makes the fibres twist and become situated obliquely, produces between those fibres such a separation as causes the cord to thicken or swell, and, by a necessary consequence, to shorten. The twisted threads of which cloths are fabricated, may be considered as small cords which experience in like manner a contraction by the action of...
Page 154 - Saussure assumes two fixed terms, one of which is the extreme of humidity, and the other that of dryness : he determines the first by placing the hygrometer under a glass receiver, the whole interior surface of which he had completely moistened with water ; the air being saturated by this water, acts by its humidity upon the hair to lengthen it. He moistened anew the interior of the receiver, as often as it was necessary ; and he knew that the term of extreme humidity was attained, when, by a longer...
Page ix - ... which produced them need only disappear, in order that the bodies may return to their former state; if, moreover, the laws which determine the reciprocal action of the same bodies are propagated to distances more or less considerable, the results of our...

Bibliographic information