A Gazetteer of the Countries Adjacent to India on the Northwest: Including Sinde, Afghanistan, Beloochistan, the Punjab, and the Neighbouring States, Volume 1

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W.H. Allen, 1844
 

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Page v - To note the various countries, provinces, or territorial divisions, and to describe the physical characteristics of each, together with their statistical, social, and political circumstances. To these are added minute descriptions of the principal...
Page xx - Esq., with Notes and a Geographical and Historical Introduction, together with a Map of the Countries between the Oxus and Jaxartes, and a Memoir regarding its construction. By CHARLES WADDINGTON, of the East India Company's Engineers.
Page xvii - SECOND MEMOIR ON THE ANCIENT COINS FOUND AT BEGHRAM, IN THE KOHISTAN OF KABUL.
Page 96 - Khelat, for the exaction of retribution from that Chieftain, and for the execution of such arrangements as would establish future security in that quarter...
Page 184 - The defences consist of a square of three hundred yards, protecting an octagonal fort, in the centre of which is a lofty mass of buildings commanding the surrounding country. The supply of water from the mountain-streams is liable to be cut off by the hostile Khyberees of the adjacent hills. In the hope of providing a remedy for this inconvenience, the Sikhs have sunk a well two hundred feet deep, but without reaching water. Lat. 33 58', long. 71 30'.
Page 283 - The rock of the same name itself with the rajah's stronghold on the east end of it, was a very conspicuous object. The stream from the valley of Shighur, which joins the Indus, as it washes its foot, was visible from the spot where I stood, but the latter river was hidden by the height of its left bank, whilst on the north, and wherever the eye could rove, arose with surpassing grandeur a vast assemblage of the enormous summits that compose the Tibetian Himalaya.
Page 282 - I, the first European who had ever beheld them (so I believe), gazed downwards from a height of six or seven thousand feet upon the sandy plains and green orchards of the valley of the Indus at Iskardo." " The rock of the same name itself with the rajah's stronghold on the east end of it, was a very conspicuous object. The stream from the valley of Shighur, which joins the Indus, as it washes its foot, was visible...
Page xvii - The Travels of Marco Polo, a Venetian, in the thirteenth century ; being a description, by that early traveller, of remarkable places and things in the eastern parts of the world ; translated from the Italian, with notes. By Wm.
Page 350 - The iU93- first fall of snow restores the clearness of the air. Though snow lies to the average depth of two feet from the early part of December to the middle of April, the cold in general is a few degrees only below the freezing point. The Jailum is seldom completely frozen over, though ice invariably covers the surface of the lakes to a considerable distance from the banks. The snow begins to disappear in March. " The end of March and beginning of April are distinguished by the popular term of...
Page 350 - By the end of that month the trees are stripped of their leaves and the year's vegetation is killed off, a thick haze overspreads the whole valley, and the lakes and rivers send up clouds of vapour. Every movement of men or beasts raises great quantities of dust, and the haze becomes so great that even at mid-day, and under a cloudless sky, no object can be seen at a mile's distance. This murky state of the air extends for about 200 feet above the level of the valley ; and those who...

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