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shall I say of the Jerusalem which is above, which lies on the other side of the river of death, where the everlasting palm trees grow, and the still waters flow from the eternal hills, and the angels sing to their golden harps among the trees of paradise ? Tirither we are journeying, we happy pilgrims, from Jerusalem to Jerusalem. Whilst ye who love the world, and the things that are in the world, are on your way to Tophet, to the valley of destruction, to everlasting night, we are going to full and cheerful day, and on our staff is inscribed, “ The citizenship of heaven.” And if we sometimes appear to you as those that dream, and you see our eyes glistening with tears whilst looking at the far blue distance, it is because of our longing for home ; and all you can say is, “ They are weeping after Jerusalem !”

And who has built us the city, and who has made it so beautiful for us ! Jerusalem is the city of the great King.

Here is my rest for ever ; here will I dwell !” saith he. He dwells there, and the city rests peacefully under the wings of his love. We are travelling to Jerusalem.

I KINGS XIX. 5-8.

“ And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, then an angel

touched him, and said unto him, Arise and eat. And he looked, and, behold, there was a cake baken on the coals, and a cruse of water at his head. And he did eat and drink, and laid him down again. And the angel of the Lord came again the second time, and touched him, and said, Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee. And he arose, and did eat and drink, and went in the strength of that meat forty days and forty nights unto Horeb the mount of God.”

This narrative belongs to the children of God, especially to the afflicted amongst them. The Lord's faithful care over his servants, especially in a dark and cloudy season, is here displayed in the most heart-refreshing manner. This Divine and gracious protection is made apparent, I. In the answer to prayer, which the prophet receives ; II. In the appearance of an angel, whom the Lord sends to him; III. In the miraculous refreshments of which he partakes; IV. In the delightful prospect which God opens before him; and, V. In the supernatural strength given him for his journey through the desert. Let us devoutly meditate on these delightful manifestations of the paternal love of our God.

I. Elijah had wished for death, after being obliged to give up the hope of the regeneration of his beloved Israel. Life had no longer any attractions for him. The love of life can bear up under the privation of many earthly endearments, but it cannot

take now my

survive hope. When Elijah sees this flower fading, he sinks, and is weary of his existence. And if he had not been a man of God—ah! who knows into what still more dreadful abyss than that of impatience and despondency he might have fallen!

It appeared as if the Lord had suddenly given up his work, and his prophet with it. The Divine superintendence was concealed too deeply in the disguise of second causes for a mortal eye to penetrate through it. Nay, it seemed to have been withdrawn, and to have left room for human vicissitudes; at least it seemed so to the prophet. He was unable, in such an unexpected turn of affairs, to discover the intentions of God. He found himself, as it were, in a dark labyrinth, without any candle of the Lord to shine upon his faith, or any clue to conduct him through it. And if we consider how such situations of the godly are always taken advantage of by the powers of darkness, and how the tempter doubtless assaulted the fugitive under the juniper tree with the fiery darts of distressing doubts and horrible suggestions, we can easily comprehend how even such a champion as Elijah could thus despond; and, in the deepest dejection and anguish of soul, cry to Heaven, and say, “Lord, it is enough!

life from me, for I am not better than my fathers !” Such prayers, however, which ascend towards heaven rather in the wild bursts of carnal passion, than in the sacred fire of Divine love, and which are not borne upwards to God upon

the wings of faith and hope, but upon

of natural excitement-such

the Lord is not wont to answer ; yet he does hear, so merciful is he, the breathings of the pious soul, ascending through all this clamour of carnal feeling, and in spite of it. Experience shows, that He is not willing to let his children finish their course in vexation and sadness. However violently the storms may rage around that spiritual life which is in them, he suffers it not to be swallowed up and drowned in the commotion. Their sky generally becomes serene again before they reach the harbour—if not temporally, yet spiritually. Listen, ye wounded and sorrowful souls! your hour of removal will not arrive till the Lord has first reconciled you to his providential government and gracious discipline, and compelled you cheerfully to acknowledge that “He doeth all things well !” A calm will succeed the storms and tempests of your life, although it may not be till the evening of your pilgrimage ; and you shall be enabled to say, “ Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace !” Yea, you shall become willing to bear, even still longer, the cross after him, if it be the Lord's pleasure. Your course will terminatenot tumultuously—no, but in the cheerful serenity of a sabbatical

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survive hope. When Elijah sees this fouet färg, he sinks, and is weary of his existence. And if he had not been a man of God-ah! who knows into what still more dreadful abyss than that of impatience and despondency he .ght have fallen!

It appeared as if the Lord had suddenly given up his work, and this propbet with it. The Divine superintendence was concealed too deeply in the disguise of second causes for a mortal ere to penetrate through it. Nay, it seemed to have been withdawn, and to have left room for human vicissitudes ; at least I seemed so to the prophet. He was unable, in such an unexpored turn of afairs, to discover the intentions of God. He found mmself, as it were, in a dark labyrinth, without any cande d' the Lord to shine upon his faith, or any clue to conduct brim drouçt And if we consider how such situations of the godit art awera taien advantage of by the powers of darkness, aut fuow the tempter doubtless assaulted the fugitive under the Jumler Tru wil the fiery darts of distressing doubts and horrible SLISESTIOLES, we can easily comprehend how even such a challpum as Lilja uurid thas despond; and, in the deepest dejection al algusse d soLL.. to Heaven, and say, “Lord, it is enough! Zakt 10 minit from me, for I am not better than my fathers !"

bue. Travers. Hwater, which ascend towards heaven rather 11 tie 1 Dursts orzal passion, than in the sacred fire of Drve. Je aut vinct are not borne upwards to God upon the Flug ( uaiti aut minde. but upon the gusts of natural excite. 1122520 pravers uit Lord is not wont to answer; yet he does 122: mercilu s it. the breathings of the pious soul, ascendun toron ai tils cannour of carnal feeling, and in spite of it. Editorze: 0.10, tiæ He is not willing to let his children finish ter Cure 1. Fant ad sadness. However violently the HOTS Taz_zaz aromit sa spiritual life which is in thein, he BeT DC v P swalowed up and drowned in the commotion. Care se geeezar uma serene again before they reach the 2012 ner sezmisurulit, Tet spiritually. Listen, ye wounded 2 STOTIL 103, vuur bour of removal will not arrive till It wilt in benciut too to his providential government 21_20st. aut repelled you cheerfully to acknowHelle tage te deti al ng well!” A calm will succeed - SITE > Ball 2017.PES I vow life, although it may not be till Det gir emas, and you shall be enabled to say,

tu 17 wrtant depart in peace !" Yea, Nu tak sempat meren still longer, the cross after

Deasure. Your course will terminate Hi vanuka-W0U5-6). n te cheerful serenity of a sabbatical

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and

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dawn; and in the midst of a radiance, beaming from the heavenly Zion, will your Divine Friend translate you to the joy of the eternal hills, that his guidance may be extolled not only above, but even here below, and his grace and faithfulness be glorified in the sight of your surviving brethren, and of an ungodly world.

This sabbatical morning had not yet dawned upon Elijah. It was now one of the darkest moments of his life, in which he seemed like a man who had fallen out both with God and with the world. The request which, in time of weakness and gloomy despondency, he had ventured to bring before God, was denied him. His life was not taken from him. He must yet live to see glorious things, and learn again to praise the faithfulness of Him whose promises are Yea and Amen; he must yet be brought to feel humbled and astonished at his former doubts and anxieties; to find the most pleasing solution of every apparent difficulty and contradiction in God's dealings with him, and to be placed in such a sunshine of Divine favour, as he had never before enjoyed. And then would be the time to say, “ It is enough ;” and the hour would come, when—not under a solitary tree in the dreary wilderness—no, but in splendid triumph, he should be carried directly over the dark valley into the land of everlasting rest.

Oh that we were not so impatient, when our gracious God occasionally denies our requests! How kind it is, with respect to our real and best interests, that the Lord gives us according to his will, and not according to our own; and that he condescends so graciously to guard us against the attainment of our poor and often foolish wishes ! We may rest assured, that whenever we pray without success, that which we desire, is not only not best for us, but would either be injurious, or is at least inferior to what he really intends for us. How many a faithful minister would never have experienced the Lord's faithfulness crowning the labours of his servants, had he been called away from this life at the time when, in gloomy despondency, he desired it! How many a christian pilgrim would never have seen any thing of the spiritual manna, and of the spiritual streams from the rocks, had God listened to him when, with fear and trembling, he besought him not to lead him into a desert! How many a brother would this day be unable to rejoice that the power of Christ has so rested upon him, if the thorn in his flesh, the messenger of Satan, had been removed at the time he entreated such relief with many cries and tears! Take courage, therefore, my brethren! Believe that the denial, which the Lord occasionally puts upon our requests, will eventually

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