The Eighteenth Century: Or, Illustrations of the Manners and Customs of Our Grandfathers

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Chapman and Hall, 1856 - 334 pages
 

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Page 316 - Roger, and has lived at his house in the nature of a chaplain above thirty years. This gentleman is a person of good sense and some learning, of a very regular life and obliging conversation : he heartily loves Sir Roger, and knows that he is very much in the old knight's esteem, so that he lives in the family rather as a relation than a dependent.
Page 270 - To be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution, and there to be hanged by the neck until you be dead ! — dead ! ! — dead ! ! ! " But, notwithstanding all this, crime increased.
Page 317 - ... behalf of one or other of my tenants his parishioners. There has not been a lawsuit in the parish since he has lived among them; if any dispute arises, they apply themselves to him for the decision; if they do not acquiesce in his judgment, which I think never happened above once or twice at most, they appeal to me. At his first settling with me...
Page 317 - I have given him the parsonage of the parish; and because I know his value, have settled upon him a good annuity for life. If he outlives me, he shall find that he was higher in my esteem than perhaps he thinks he is. He has now been with me thirty years; and though he does...
Page 317 - As I was walking with him last night, he asked me how I liked the good man whom I have just now mentioned ? and without staying for my answer, told me that he was afraid of being insulted with Latin and Greek at his own table...
Page 30 - THERE is not so variable a thing in nature as a lady's head-dress. Within my own memory, I have known it rise and fall above thirty degrees. About ten years ago it shot up to a very great height, insomuch that the female part of our species were much taller than the men *. The women were of such an enormous stature, that ' we appeared as grasshoppers before them t.
Page 37 - Their petticoats, which began to heave and swell before you left us, are now blown up into a most enormous concave, and rise every day more and more. In short, sir, since our women know themselves to be out of the eye of the Spectator, they will be kept within no compass.
Page 160 - ... breakings down. They will here meet with ruts, which I actually measured, four feet deep, and floating with mud, only from a wet summer.
Page 22 - ... bras between his hands, as if he wished to compress it, or under his arm; knees bent and feet on tiptoe, as if afraid of a wet floor. His...
Page 316 - Roger's family, because it consists of sober and staid persons ; for as the knight is the best master in the world, he seldom changes his servants ; and as he is beloved by all about him, his servants never care for leaving him ; by this means his domestics are all in years, and grown old with their master.

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