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Laurence's, Dr. Sermon on Maskers of Moorfields, a

Baptismal Regeneration 549 Vision, by Griffinhoof .. 655
Lectures on Apocalytical Mathias's Case of Johanna
Epistles, by Kittle .. 300 Southcott

323
Bampton, by Dr. Mégha Dúta, a Poem, trans-

Van Mildert...

251 lated from the Sanscrit,

Lectures on Inflammation, by H. H. Wilson.. 97

by Dr. Thomson . 70 Memoire addressé au Roi,

Letter to the Duke of Kent,

158
on Consumption, by Dr. Miscellaneous Papers of
Sutton
554 John Smeaton

668
Letters from Albion 666 Monthly List of Publications

to the Bishop of 109, 222, 330, 445, 556, 669

London, by W. Belsham 623 Moreau, Gen. Life of, by

on India, by Maria

Phillipart

104

Graham

221 Musical Annecdotes, by

Life of General Moreau, by Mr. Burgh ..

326

J. Phillipart ....

104

Literary Intelligence 112, 224,

336, 448, 560, 672

N.

Lloyd's Sermons on the So-

vereignty of God...... 649

London, Bishop of, Charge Naismith on the Corn Laws 46

to his Clergy

1

Nares, Dr. Sermon preach-

Lord of the Isles, a Poem,

ed before the University
by W. Scott, Esq. 130 of Oxford

302

Lysons' Magna Britannia, New Covering for the Velvet

Vol. III.

23 Cushion ..

Mathematical Tables,

by Peter Barlow 665

Norris's, Rev. H. H. Addi-
Mc Henry's Spanish Exer-

tional Notes and Illus-

cises.

314

trations...

591

Malthus's Mr, Grounds of

an Opinion on Inporta-

tion of Corn....

317

0.

Inquiry into

the Nature of Rent .... 389

Mant's, Miss, Ellen a Tale 313

Observations on Consump-

Rev. R. Parent's

tion, by Dr. Pears... 554
Poetical Anthology.... 310

-made on a Tour

Marion of Drymnagh, a from Hamburgh, by R.

Poem, by M. W. Hart-

Semple...

315

stonge

92 Old English Plays, Selec-
Marsh's, Dr. Accession Ser-

tion of

278
77 Only Child, a Poem 308
Comparative Ordeal, a Novel

311
View of the Churches of Orphans, or Battle of Ne-
England and Rome.... 494 · vil's Cross, a Poem.... 201

Paddy

.... 552

M.

mon

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PAGB

PAGE Reflections on the Financial

Paddy Hew, a Poem .... 436 System of Great Britain,

Parents' Poetical Antholo-

by Walter Boyd..... 38

gy, by the Rev. R. Mant 310 Religious and Moral Re-
Paris Chit Chat

517 flections, by S. Hop-
Pearce's Treatise on the

kinson

305
Abuse of Laws .... 555 Researches into the Phy-
Pears's, Dr. Observations sical History of Man, by
on Consumption .... 554 J. C. Prichard

292
Penn, Granville, on the Pro- Roberts's, Mrs. Duty, a
phecy of Ezekiel ...... 225 Novel ..

553

Phillipart’s Life of General Rodd's Sonnets and Poems 207

Moreau

... 104 Roderick, the last of the

Playfair's Political Portraits 107 Goths, a Poem, by R.
Poems, by Frederick Thorn.

Southey

353

hill, Esq.

307 Rouse's Doctrine of Chances 320

Poetical Register for 1810, Rules of Life

661
1811...,

98

Policy of restraining the

Importation of Corn, by

S.

Philalethes

317

Political Memento 217 Sarsfield, a Novel, by J.

Popular Survey of the Re-

Gamble

208

formation, by G. Cus- Saxon and the Gael, a Novel 659

tance

551 Scott's W. Lord of the Isles,

Practical Hints to young

a Poem

130

Females, by Mrs. Taylor 556 Selection of Old English
View of Christian
Flays

278

Education

304

Semple's Observations made

Prichard's Researches into

on a Tour from Ham-

the Physical History of

burgh

315

Man

292

Sermon, Accession, by Dr.

Principle of the Poor Laws

Marsh

77

illustrated, by J. Weyland 663

oon Baptismal Re-

Property Tax, Considera-

generation, by Dr. Lau-

tions on the .

166

549

Prosodia Græca, by G.

Dr. Collyer's, at

Dunbar ::

17

Salter's Hall

200

for the National

Schools, by Dr. Gaskin 80

R,

preached before

the University of Oxford, i
Recherches sur les Ranz des by Dr. Nares

302
Vaches, par Tarenne.. 239

preached at York
Recreations in Mathema.

Assize, by the Rev. F.
tics, by Dr. Hutton 409 Wrangham

197
Reflections on the Educa-

by the Rev. A.
eation of the Poor.... 428 Alison

57

Sermons,
555 Assize Sermon... 200

rence

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PAGE

PAGE

Sermons, by Sir Adam Gor-

Thomson's, Dr. Lectures

dôn

427

on Inflammation

70

on our Lord's Re-

Thornhill's Poems

307

surrection, by Bishop Towers of Ravenswold, á

Horsley

561 Novel, 'by W. H. Hit-

on the Sovereignty

chener

103

of God, by R. Lloyd.. 649 Tracts on India, by Dr.

by Dr. Somerville 175

Heyne

147

J. Vincent...... 432 Translation of Eloisa to

Smeaton's Miscellaneous Abelard, by Boschini 309

Papers

668

--Juvenal, by Dr.

Smedley's Jephtha, a Poem 96 C. Badham

418

Smith's Wealth of Nations, Treatise on the Abuse of

Buchanan's Edition of .. 121 the Laws by J, Pearce 555

Sonnets, Anthology of, by

Supposed He-

262 reditary Properties of

and other Poems,

Diseases, by Dr. Adams 314

by T. Rodd ...

207 Tythes, Benet and Coxe

Sortes Horatianæ, a Poem 204 on Commutation of .... 113

Southcote, Johanna, Ma-

thias's Case of ..

323

Southey's Roderick, the last

V.

of the Goths, a Poem.. 353

Spanish Exercises, by L. J. Van Mildert's, Dr. Bamp-

A. Mc Henry

314, ton, Lectures

251

Spurzheim and Gall's Phy- Velvet Cushion, a new Co-

siological System.. 468

vering for the

522

Storer's History of British Vincent's Practical Sermons 432

Cathedrals

103

Sutton's, Dr. Letter to the

Duke of Kent, on Con-

sumption

554

Weyland's Poor Laws illus-

trated

663

Wilmot's, Mrs. Ina, a Tra-

T.

gedy

438

Wilson's Translation of

Tales for Cottagers ...... 311 Mégha Dúta ... 97

Tarenne's Recherches sur Wordsworth's Excursion, a

les Ranz des Vaches .. 239 Poem

449

Taylor's, Mrs. Practical Wrangham's, Rev. F. York

Hints

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THE

BRITISH CRITIC,

FOR JANUARY, 1815.

ÅRT. I. Charge delivered to the Clergy of the Diocese of Lon.

don, at the primary Visitation of that Diocese, in the Year 1814. By William, Lord Bishop of London. 4to. 2s. 6d.

Payne and Foss. 1814. FOR the

appearance of no theological work, within our me. mory, has the attention of the world waited with so much anxiety, as for the publication of the charge now before us. The sudden elevation of its author to the highest episcopal throne in these dominions, the character for learning and piety which accompanied him in the divinity chair of Oxford, the eagerness 10 ascertain the opinions of such a man upon those important questions which now agitate the Church, all conspired to direct the public view to the first official declaration of the newly created prelate. The favourable report of the few who were present at its delivery, might also have influenced to a still higher degree the general desire to see it embodied in a more permanent form.

Awful as the responsibility must be, which is in every case attached to the episcopal office in these days of latitudinarian innovation and multiplied division, upon no one does the weight fall with more severity of pressure, than upon him, to whom the administration of the diocese of London shall have been by Providence entrusted. Situated as he is at the fountain head of all infidelity and schism, and surrounded by enemies of every denomination and description, the duties, and the anxieties of oftice are doubled upon him. But in proportion to the diffi-, culties which attend the discharge of his high and holy duty, is the extent of his influence and the power of his example.

In the present political state of our country, to the metropolis are directed the eyes of the distant parts of the empire, as to the rallying point no less of sound and constitutional principle than of the feuds of faction and disorganization. In the vast and complicated machine of our civil and ecclesiastical esta. blishment, however distant its parts may be, none of them are

B

unconnected VOL. III. JANUARY, 1815.

unconnected with or independent of the main spring and centre of motion which the metropolis exhibits. From the sentiment and opinions which there prevail, the whole country in various: degrees takes its tone: with respect to ecclesiastical affairs, in London are situated all those associations of support, by which the interests of the Church are maintained, and all those combinations of hostility, by which she is openly assaulted, or secretly undermined. From the operation of these and similar causes, the clergy of London are placed upon an eminence to which the view of their brethren, in every distant province, is constantly directed; while to the opinions, the language, and the conduct of their Diocesan is a still higher consequence and veneration attached. Whatever, therefore, may be the importance which we attach to an episcopal charge in a distant diocese, much greater is the influence of that, to which the clergy of the whole kingdom naturally look up, as to the criterion of the feeling upon religious matters in the metropolis, and as a declaration from the very penetralia of ecclesiastical government.

With these views, therefore, we shall present our readers with an analysis of the charge before us, which, if we mistake not, will have a far more powerful effect upon their minds than the gratification of any ordinary feeling, or the satisfaction of general curiosity.

The charge opens with a tribute of public veneration and private regard to the memory of the venerable prelate, to whom he immediately succeeded. This is no common effusion of customary compliment, but a pious, sincere, and heartfelt testimony to the virtues of a man, who bravely faced the dangers which surrounded him, and presented an undaunted front against the acrimonious scurrility and abusive malevolence with which he was assaulted by every enemy of the Church. To the soundest principles he added a decision and a spirit which enabled him to execute, with perseverance and vigour, what he conceived in justice and wisdom. If, in manner, he was too unbending for that secular intercourse, which his diocese so peculiarly required, in his actions also he preserved the same unwavering determination. In his eulogium, therefore, on the virtues and the labours of his predecessor, the Bishop will be cordially joined by every friend of the establishment.

In the execution of a far more difficult task the Bishop is peculiarly happy. Very rarely have we heard a man speak of himself and his own pretensions with so much frank and unaffected modesty, declaring itself, not in an absurd disavowak of those abilities which every wise man is assured, and every coxcomb fancies he possesses, but in that real and unreserved distrust in the strength of his own powers, which teaches him to

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