Mary, queen of Scots, and other poems

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C. Roworth, 1829 - 127 pages
 

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Page 57 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity...
Page 55 - N'a c'y de moi que la moitié: Une part te reste , elle est tienne ; Je la fie à ton amitié Pour que de l'autre il te souvienne.
Page 27 - Adieu! farewell! it came with a lass, and it will pass with a lass: and so he recommended himself to the mercy of Almighty God, and spake little from that time forth, but turned his back to his lords, and his face to the wall.
Page 83 - Rizzio, and a few other persons, the king suddenly entered the apartment by a private passage. At his back was Ruthven, clad in complete armour, and with that ghastly and horrid look which long sickness had given him. Three or four of his most trusty accomplices followed him. Such an unusual...
Page 84 - Rizzio to leave a place of which he was unworthy, and which he had occupied too long. Mary employed tears, and entreaties, and threatenings, to save her favourite. But, notwithstanding all these, he was torn from her by violence, and before he could be dragged through the next apartment, the rage of his enemies put an end to his life, piercing his body with fifty-six wounds.
Page 57 - ... and adjoining it is a cemetery, in which many ancient kings of Scotland, Ireland, and Norway, are buried. Other ruins of monastic and druidical edifices can be traced ; and many places are pointed out, noted for particular acts of St. Columba. This island was the retreat of learning, during the Gothic ignorance which pervaded Europe, after the overthrow of the Roman Empire ; and the seminary whence issued those pious monks and laymen who again revived learning, and propagated Christianity through...
Page 56 - Here are the ruins of an august nunnery, monastery, and cathedral, said to have l>een founded by »St. Columba, about the year 735 ; also a small chapel, dedicated to St. Oran, containing many marble tombstones of the great lords of the isles ; and adjoining it is a cemetery, in which many ancient kings of Scotland, Ireland, and Norway, are buried. Other ruins of monastic and Druidical edifices can be traced ; and many places are pointed out, Tioted for particular acts of St.
Page 59 - Tis certainly reported there was some jar betwixt the Queen and him, at an entertainment in a merchant's house in Edinburgh, she only dissuaded him from drinking too much himself, and enticing others; in both which he proceeded, and gave her such words that she left the place with tears ; which they that are known to their proceedings, say is not strange to be seen.
Page 90 - J'en suis fors qu'un corps prive de cueur ; Un ombre vayn, un object de malheur, Qui n'a plus rien que de mourir en vie. Plus ne me portez, O enemys, d'envie, Qui n'a plus 1'esprit...
Page 60 - His government is very much blamed, for he is thought to be wilful and haughty, and some say vicious; whereof too many were witnesses, the other day at Inchkeith, with the Lord Robert,* Fleming, and such like grave personages...

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