The Republic, Or, A History of the United States of America in the Administrations: From the Monarchic Colonial Days to the Present Times, Volume 9

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Fairbanks and Palmer Publishing Company, 1888
 

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Page 476 - Sir, I wish you to understand the true principles of the government; I wish them carried out; I ask nothing more...
Page 93 - The general boundary line between the lands of the United States, and the lands of the said Indian tribes, shall begin at the mouth of the Cuyahoga river, and run thence up the same to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of the Muskingum; thence down that branch to the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; thence...
Page 449 - We admit of no Government by Divine right— believing that, so far as power is concerned, the beneficent Creator has made no distinction among men; that all are upon an equality; and that the only legitimate right to govern, is an express grant of power from the governed.
Page 438 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against antirepublican tendencies...
Page 311 - We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Page 331 - Father, listen to your children! you have them now all before you. "The war before this, our British father gave the hatchet to his red children, when our old chiefs were alive. They are now dead. In that war our father was thrown on his back by the Americans; and our father took them by the hand without our knowledge : and we are afraid that our father will do so again at this time.
Page 233 - Inhabitants of Canada ! After thirty years of peace and prosperity, the United States have been driven to arms. The injuries and aggressions, the insults and indignities of Great Britain have once more left them no alternative but manly resistance or unconditional submission.
Page 44 - I have now informed you of the boundaries of the Miami nation, where the Great Spirit placed my forefather a long time ago, and charged him not to sell or part with his lands, but to preserve them for his posterity.
Page 43 - Scioto ; from thence to its mouth; from thence down the Ohio to the mouth of the Wabash; and from thence to Chicago, on Lake Michigan.
Page 453 - It cannot be claimed from the power to recommend, since, although enjoined as a duty upon him, it is a privilege which he holds in common with every other citizen. And although there may be something more of confidence in the propriety of the measures recommended in the one case than in the other, in the obligations of ultimate decision there can be no difference. In the language of the Constitution, " all the legislative powers" which it grants " are vested in the Congress of the United States.

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