The Upanishads: The Khândogya-upanishad. The Talavakâra-upanishad. The Aitareya-âranyaka. The Kaushîtaki-brâhmana-upanishad the the Vâgasaneyi-samhitâ-upanishad

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Clarendon Press, 1879
 

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Page 123 - Where one sees nothing else, hears nothing else, understands nothing else, that is the Infinite. Where one sees something else, hears something else, understands something else, that is the finite. The Infinite is immortal, the finite is mortal.
Page 140 - Taking fuel in his hands, he went again as a pupil to Pra</apati. Pra^apati said to him : ' Maghavat, as you went away satisfied in your heart, for what purpose did you come back ? ' " He said : ' Sir, although it is true that that Self is not blind even if the body is blind, nor lame if the body is lame, though it is true that that Self is not rendered faulty by the faults of...
Page 107 - Believe it, my son. That which is the subtile essence, in it all that exists has its Self. It is the True. It is the Self, and thou, 0 /Svetaketu, art it.' ' Please, Sir, inform me still more,' said the son. ' Be it so, my child,
Page v - I my self have, by a long continued profession, made almost natural to me: I am resolved to be more jealous and suspicious of this religion, than of the rest, and be sure not to entertain it any longer without being convinced by solid and substantial arguments, of the truth and certainty of it.
Page 102 - That which is that subtile essence, in it all that exists has its self. It is the True. It is the Self, and thou, Svetaketu, art it.' 'Please, Sir, inform me still more,' said the son. 'Be it so, my child,' the father replied. i. 'Fetch me from thence a fruit of the nyagrodha tree.' 'Here is one, Sir.' 'Break it.
Page 111 - ... what is right and what is wrong; what is true and what is false ; what is good and what is bad...
Page 15 - Fasti Romani. The Civil and Literary Chronology of Rome and Constantinople, from the Death of Augustus to the Death of Heraclius.
Page 135 - It is the Self, free from sin, free from old age, from death and grief, from hunger and thirst, which desires nothing but what it ought to desire, and imagines nothing but what it ought to imagine.
Page 140 - Just as we are, well adorned, with our best clothes and clean, thus we are both there, Sir, well adorned, with our best clothes and clean." Prajapati said: "That is the Self, this is the immortal, the fearless, this is Brahman.
Page 92 - ... and as, my dear, by one nugget of gold all that is made of gold is known, the difference being only a name, arising from speech, but the truth being that all is gold...

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