"Dame Curtsey's" Book of Party Pastimes for the Up-to-date Hostess

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A.C. McClurg & Company, 1912 - 296 pages
 

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This is a very charming book, and a great read. Very quaint picture of life in 1912.
Some favorite quotes:
"In the present day Hallow Eve is the proper time for all sorts of frolics…"
"All went into the big living-room with its many symbolic decorations; they roasted marshmallows and chestnuts, told stories and did such stunts as separating peas from beans, with eyes blindfolded. A prize was given the one who had the most beans in ten minutes."
"After refreshments all joined a jolly game of “pussy wants a corner.”"
 

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Page 154 - When Freedom, from her mountain height, Unfurled her standard to the air, She tore the azure robe of night, And set the stars of glory there; She mingled with its gorgeous dyes The milky baldric of the skies, And striped its pure, celestial white With streakings of the morning light; Then, from his mansion in the sun, She called her eagle bearer down, And gave into his mighty hand, The symbol of her chosen land.
Page 154 - He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat; He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment seat : Oh ! be swift, my soul, to answer Him ! be jubilant, my feet ! Our God is marching on. In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me : As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, While God is marching on.
Page 39 - BELIEVE me, if all those endearing young charms, Which I gaze on so fondly to-day, Were to change by to-morrow, and fleet in my arms, Like fairy-gifts fading away, Thou wouldst still be adored, as this moment thou art, Let thy loveliness fade as it will. And around the dear ruin each wish of my heart Would entwine itself verdantly still.
Page 99 - Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land ? Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned, From wandering on a foreign strand...
Page 173 - Twas Christmas told the merriest tale ; A Christmas gambol oft could cheer The poor man's heart through half the year.
Page 12 - Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky, The flying cloud, the frosty light; The year is dying in the night; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die. Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring, happy bells, across the snow; The year is going, let him go; Ring out the false, ring in the true.
Page 69 - A SWARM of bees in May Is worth a load of hay; A swarm of bees in June Is worth a silver spoon; A swarm of bees in July Is not worth a fly.
Page 200 - Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.
Page 91 - It is in Music perhaps that the soul most nearly attains the great end for which, when inspired by the Poetic Sentiment, it struggles — the creation of supernal Beauty.
Page 17 - Oh! why should the spirit of mortal be proud?— . Like a swift-fleeting meteor, a fast-flying cloud, A flash of the lightning, a break of the wave, He passeth from life to his rest in the grave.

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