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Works Published by Trübner & Co., 60, Paternoster Row, London.

In 8 vols., 8vo.
THE SACRED HYMNS OF THE BRAHMINS
A8 PRESERVED TO US IN THE OLDEST COLLECTION OF RELIGIOUS POETRY,

THE RIG-VEDA-SANHITA,

TRANSLATED AND EXPLAINED, By Max MÜLLER, M.A., Taylorian Professor of Modern Europea Languages in the University of Oxford ; Fellow of All Souls College. (Vol. I. is in the Press.)

Now ready, in 1 vol., 8vo, pp. xxxvi. and 388, with numerous full-page

illustrations, price 21s. THE SACRED CITY OF THE HINDUS :: AN ACCOUNT OF BENARES IN ANCIENT AND MODERN TIMES.

By the Rev. M. A. SHERRING, M.A., LL.D. And prefaced with an Introduction by FITZEDWARD HALL, Esq., D.C.L.

In 1 vol., 8vo, half-bound.

A COLLECTION OF SOME OF THE MISCELLANEOUS ESSAYS ON ORIENTAL

SUBJECTS,

Published on various occasions. By EDWARD THOMAS, Esq., late of the East India Company's Bengal

Civil Service. CONTENTS.-On Ancient Indian Weights—The Earliest Indian Coinage

Bactrian Coins-On the Identity of Xandrames and Krananda-Note on Indian Numerals—On the Coins of the Gupta Dynasty-Early Armenian Coins - Observations Introductory to the Explanation of the Oriental Legends to be found on certain Imperial and Partho-Persian CoinsSassanian Gems and early Armenian Coins-Notes on certain unpublished Coins of the Sassanide-An account of Eight Kúfic Coins-Supplementary Contributions to the Series of the Coins of the Kings of Ghazni-Supplementary Contributions to the Series of the Coins of the Patan Sultans of Hindustan—The Initial Coinage of Bengal, introduced by the Muhammadans on the conquest of the courtry, A.H. 600—800, A.D. 1203—1397.

Very few Copies only of this Collection remain unsold.

Now ready, in 1 vol., 8vo, pp. 148, Illustrated, price 7s. 6d.
EARLY SASSANIAN INSCRIPTIONS,

SEALS AND COINS,
Illustrating the Early History of the Sassanian Dynasty.
Containing Proclamations of Ardeshir Babek, Sapor I., and his Success-

With a Critical Examination and Explanation of the Celebrated Inscription in the Hájíábad Cave, demonstrating that Sapor, the Conqueror of Valerian, was a Professing Christian. By EDWARD 'Ï'HOMAS, Esq.

N. TRÜBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.

ors.

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CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

CHAPTER II.

Rajmahal.—The Mootee-Jhurna waterfall.—Secreegully—The

Terriagurry Pass.—Peer-Pointee.-Colgong.–Bhagulpore.-
Cleveland's monuments.-Mount Mandar.---The rock of Jan-
geerah.—Sultangung.—The ancient Buddhist Vihara, or nion-

CHAPTER III.

Introductory remarks.—Railway in India.—Pundova tower.-

Battle of the Cow.—The ghost of a bovine Bhuggobuttee.
The iron rod, or Shah Sufi's walking-stick.—Peer-pukur and
Fatikhan, or the tame alligator.--Boinchi.—The robber in
India.—The Amazon Kali.—Mamaree.—Burdwan.—The tale
of Biddya and Soondra.—Biddyapotta, or the abode of Biddya.

-The Maun-surrobur, or Raja Maun's tank.—The Mushan,

or the place of Soondra's execution.—The Nabobhaut.

Shere Afkun's tomb.—The old Rajbaree.The Maharajah

of Burdwan.—Kristoshair and female swimmers.—The Dilk-

hoosa-baug.-The menagerie and its lions. The future of

Hindoo shrines and temples

139

CHAPTER V.

Mount Parisnath.—Topechanchee.—The Hindoostanee proverb

about Bengal.—Jain temple at Parisnath.-Doomree.—The
desolation of the hill-regions.—The man carried by a tiger.

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