History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe: Junctures and Disjunctures in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Volume 3

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Marcel Cornis-Pope, John Neubauer
John Benjamins Publishing, 2004 - 522 pages
The third volume in the History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe focuses on the making and remaking of those institutional structures that engender and regulate the creation, distribution, and reception of literature. The focus here is not so much on shared institutions but rather on such region-wide analogous institutional processes as the national awakening, the modernist opening, and the communist regimentation, the canonization of texts, and censorship of literature. These processes, which took place in all of the region's cultures, were often asynchronous and subjected to different local conditions. The volume's premise is that the national awakening and institutionalization of literature were symbiotically interrelated in East-Central Europe. Each national awakening involves a language renewal, an introduction of the vernacular and its literature in schools and universities, the creation of an infrastructure for the publication of books and journals, clashes with censorship, the founding of national academies, libraries, and theaters, a (re)construction of national folklore, and the writing of histories of the vernacular literature. The four parts of this volume are titled: (1) Publishing and Censorship, (2) Theater as a Literary Institution, (3) Forging Primal Pasts: The Uses of Folk Poetry, and (4) Literary Histories: Itineraries of National Self-images.
 

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Contents

Editors Preface
1
List of Visual Materials xiii
31
Publishing and censorship
39
Marcel CornisPope
80
Slovak Journals between Languages and against Censorship Dagmar Roberts
89
Censorship
95
194549
114
Strategies against Censorship in Soviet Lithuania 194490 Violeta Kelertas
125
The uses of folklore
269
John Neubauer Introduction
321
Representing Transnational Real or Imaginary Regional Spaces
333
Itineraries of national selfimages
345
Macedonia in Bulgarian Literature Inna Peleva
357
Narratives Sabina Mihelj
364
Shifting genres
375
Fictionalized Autobiography
386

196889 Włodzimierz Bolecki
135
Theater as a literary institution
143
the Pesti Magyar Színház in 1837 Zoltán Imre
149
Theater Starts as an Amateur Endeavor Dagmar Roberts
158
Theater Speaks Many Languages in Romania Marian Popescu
166
The European Horizons of Stjepan Miletić Nikola Batusić
173
the Čapeks Robots Insects Women and Men
183
The Interbellum Emancipation of the Slovak Stage Dagmar Roberts
189
Polish Modernist Drama Ewa Wąchocka
196
Popular Amusement and Avantgarde in the Polish Cabaret Dorota Fox
203
The Stage in Independent Lithuania Audronė Girdzijauskaitė
210
Regional sites of cultural hybridization
213
Theater under Socialism
217
The Role
401
Miro Mašek Poeticizing Prose in Croatian and Serbian Modernism
409
Galin Tihanov The Birth of Modern Literary Theory in EastCentral Europe
416
Arent van Nieukerken Polish Poetry in the Twentieth Century
424
Works Cited
429
Marcel CornisPope Shifting Perspectives and Voices in the Romanian Novel
441
Boyko Penchev Forms of the Bulgarian Novel
456
The historical novel
463
Appendix
491
Romanian Historical Fiction and Family Cycles
499
Index of EastCentral European Names
505
Histories of multimedia constructions
513
Copyright

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Page 470 - Boehmische, maehrische und schlesische Gelehrte und Schriftsteller aus dem Orden der Jesuiten von Anfang der Gesellschaft bis auf gegenwärtige Zeit, Prag Albert Prazäk, Närod se bränil.